How the Brain Functions During Meditation

meditation pic Several forms of meditation exist, until now, little research has examined if and how these variants affect the body. Recently, researchers from the University of Oslo, the University of Sydney, and the Norwegian University of Science and Technology have teamed to study exactly how different forms of meditation affect the brain.

The researchers have initially divided meditation into two techniques. Concentrative meditation involves intense focus on breath or mantra while suppressing other thoughts. Nondirective meditation is the term for meditation that involves focus but also allows the mind to wander. The team tested 14 experienced meditators in an MRI machine while they undertook both forms of meditation.

After the tests, the team found that nondirective meditation led to higher levels of brain activity than were seen in subjects at rest. Brain activity was especially high in the parts of the brain that process thoughts and feelings. Concentrative meditation, on the other hand, caused virtually no increase in activity in these parts of the brain.

These results were surprising because they show that brain activity goes down when one focuses. In addition, the results demonstrate how nondirective meditation can actually increase space for processing memories and emotions. Typically, the area of the brain involved has its highest level of activity during rest, making it remarkable that nondirective meditation increases activity levels even more.